Skip to content
My WebMD Sign In, Sign Up

Obesity Drugs: Back to the Drawing Board or Enough is Enough?

Another drug bites the dust. In the past few weeks, we have seen sibutramine (Meridia) pulled from the shelves due to an increased risk of heart attacks, and now lorcaserin (Lorqess) has failed to pass muster with the FDA because of concerns about cancer. Many years and millions of research dollars later, our only remaining pharmaceutical arm in the fight against obesity is orlistat (Xenical), with the convenient side effects of bloating, stomach upset, and the need to have a public restroom app on your iPhone in case of emergencies.  So what’s a health care system to do?

On one hand, you might argue that Big Pharma has failed us in the obesity space.  So should they throw in the towel? The drugs work poorly, have gross side effects, and increase our health risks in other ways. Some say, why don’t we save the millions of dollars spent on drug research and instead invest them in education, legislation, and regulations that will help us eat better and exercise more? Put the money towards the health costs of the uninsured. Or, use it to fund research in diabetes, heart disease, or any of the other countless complications of obesity.

But is it too early to admit defeat?  If we had done the same for cholesterol medications or diabetes medications, or even smoking patches and pills, we’d be paying for it in countless ways.  So is there something unique about developing medications for obesity?  Obesity is considered by many to be purely a “lifestyle” disease, and some are biased against the obese as a result.  Given that we already have proven treatments (eat less and exercise more), some argue that we are wasting our time by investing heavily in a pharmaceutical solution.

As a physician who believes strongly in the power of personal choice to influence one’s health outcomes, I tend to favor an investment in healthy lifestyles.  But in all fairness to the other side of the debate, one can also argue that prevention hasn’t worked out so well either.  Despite the fact that we have effective treatments, we are not very effective in their prescription or compliance.  For example, aggressive lifestyle modification can lower heart disease risk as effectively as cholesterol medication for many people — but the fact of the matter is, some people would rather take a pill.  Obesity has skyrocketed despite our efforts at communication.  So, it looks like the health care system has failed as well.  Could our failure as health care providers actually position obesity drug research and development as the most important pharmaceutical goal of the decade?

Where do you think we should put our resources?  Do you accept the recent obesity drug hurdles in stride and want the pharmaceutical companies to take on the challenge to develop more anti-obesity medications?  Or do you think we should concentrate our efforts on non-pharmaceutical interventions?  Would you take an obesity drug if it were safe, effective, and available? I’d love to hear what you think!

Join the conversation — share your comments with the Heart Disease Community.

Comments

Leave a comment

Important:

The opinions expressed in WebMD Second Opinion are solely those of the User, who may or may not have medical or scientific training. These opinions do not represent the opinions of WebMD. Second Opinion are... Expand

Newsletters

Subscribe to free WebMD newsletters.

  • WebMD Daily

    WebMD Daily

    Subscribe to the WebMD Daily, and you'll get today's top health news and trending topics, and the latest and best information from WebMD.

  • Men's Health

    Men's Health

    Subscribe to the Men's Health newsletter for the latest on disease prevention, fitness, sex, nutrition, and more from WebMD.

  • Women's Health

    Women's Health

    Subscribe to the Women's Health newsletter for the latest on disease prevention, fitness, sex, diet, anti-aging, and more from WebMD.

By clicking Submit, I agree to the WebMD Terms & Conditions & Privacy Policy

URAC: Accredited Health Web Site HONcode Seal AdChoices