Skip to content

Top 10 Reasons Women Don't Want Sex

A common theme that runs through questions on the message boards, comments on the blog and other discussions across the Internet concerns the reasons that women are uninterested in having sex with their partners. In future entries at this blog, I’ll be expanding on each of these ten common causes:

  1. Use of oral contraceptives. Some women will find that their sexual drive is decreased by the Pill (or any of the other hormonal approaches to birth control — patch, ring, and shot).
  2. Use of antidepressants. Not everyone experiences a decrease in sexual desire, but many do.
  3. Breastfeeding. Prolactin (the hormone that facilitates breastfeeding) decreases sexual interest.
  4. Lack of sleep. For most women, sleep comes before sex once the relationship has been established.
  5. Stress. Due to work, financial issues, educational stress, extended family, and other important issues in life. When stress is increased, many women do not see sex as a solution to it.
  6. Disagreements with one’s mate. Any relationship will bring with it the challenges of conflicting feelings and desires. That can play itself out in sex.
  7. Low levels of free testosterone. While knowing the level of total testosterone in the bloodstream can be helpful, finding out the free testosterone is very essential to discovering the possible physiological causes of low sexual desire.
  8. High levels of SHBG. A woman with high levels of sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG), may have low sexual interest. This is because it combines with free testosterone (making it “unavailable”) and that decreases libido.
  9. Fear of intimacy. The inability to handle the level of intimacy that sex brings and maintains in a relationship is a very common reason for a decrease in sexual desire for one’s partner.
  10. Body image. Women who view themselves as unattractive to their mate and/or in their own mind’s eye.

Some of these issues can be addressed by doing some reading, soul searching, and communicating with one’s mate. Others will require the assistance of professional experts such as physicians, labs, and sex therapists.

Related Topics: A Woman’s Guide to Reviving Sex Drive, Guide to Perimenopause

Important:

The opinions expressed in WebMD Second Opinion are solely those of the User, who may or may not have medical or scientific training. These opinions do not represent the opinions of WebMD. Second Opinion are... Expand

Newsletters

Subscribe to free WebMD newsletters.

  • WebMD Daily

    WebMD Daily

    Subscribe to the WebMD Daily, and you'll get today's top health news and trending topics, and the latest and best information from WebMD.

  • Men's Health

    Men's Health

    Subscribe to the Men's Health newsletter for the latest on disease prevention, fitness, sex, nutrition, and more from WebMD.

  • Women's Health

    Women's Health

    Subscribe to the Women's Health newsletter for the latest on disease prevention, fitness, sex, diet, anti-aging, and more from WebMD.

By clicking Submit, I agree to the WebMD Terms & Conditions & Privacy Policy and understand that I may opt out of WebMD subscriptions at any time.

URAC: Accredited Health Web Site TRUSTe online privacy certification HONcode Seal AdChoices