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Monday, April 5, 2010

Diabetes War

Yes, Diabetes is genetic. Type 1, or childhood diabetes, as it has been called, is a function of your genes. It is not your fault that you have it, a conclusion reached by many when Type 2 Diabetes runs rampant. Type 1 presents itself arbitrarily, except for unseen branches on your family tree.

Type 2 is the story in the U.S. today. It, too, is genetic but can be headed off or controlled with a healthy diet and regular exercise. Americans are living with record levels of obesity. Massively overweight individuals become a magnet for the disease, and Type 2 rates are exploding to epidemic proportions. The condition is seen in surprisingly young kids.

Type 2 becomes a lifestyle disease because a healthy diet and regular exercise can keep it under control. The American penchant for overeating and high fat, fast food diets are fueling the fire. Look at Father Andrew, who I’ll interview later with his doctor.

The medical community is doing a dance because they do not want to peddle guilt and there is a profile of those who frequently get Type 2. Patients often are lower income, less-educated people, often minorities. Doctors, quite adroitly, hesitate to foist guilt on them. They want to draw these folks in and are afraid of pushing them away. It is not effective medicine to point fingers and assign guilt. This is where medical political correctness comes into play.

This strikes me as a high wire act. Fatty meals and junk foods are the culprits – staples for poorer people. Sitting on the couch without any exercise, even just walking, exacerbates the insidious effects of crap in your system. Maybe after the bad diagnosis appears on our doorstep, we wake up and change our ways. Maybe not.

What about our kids? McDonald’s, Coca-Cola and Campbell’s Soup, announced that their child-oriented advertising will do more to promote health foods and exercise. Right. They still are peddling the poison. These companies, which account for two-thirds of child-targeted food and drink commercials on TV, agreed to cut back the use of characters such as Shrek and the Little Mermaid to pitch unhealthy foods.

Let’s see how long that lasts. McDonald’s tried this once before, but customers just continued to go for fatty Big Macs. These companies respond to political pressure and a perceived public demand to demonstrate corporate responsibility. Then people stop buying healthy because the high-fat, sugar-soaked products are more appealing. If they build it and people do not come, we are back to where we started.

There is a push from the federal government and in some local quarters to keep crap out of our schools and get kids to learn to go healthy at snack and meal time. Of course it comes down to corporate profits. Getting companies to dump this stuff out of vending machines at schools is no easy task. In the end, it comes down equally to personal responsibility.

The doctors cannot do it all. We must be proactive. I believe we need to take more responsibility for how we lead our lives. This is not brain surgery. Why do people find it so difficult to adjust their lifestyles, regulate diet and exercise? It makes life better. Add your comments to this Discussion in the Chronic Disease & Disability Exchange.

Posted by: Richard M. Cohen at 2:34 am