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Monday, April 19, 2010

Physician, Heal Thyself

Physician, heal thyself.” So wrote Aesop, the Greek, suggesting that physical imperfection in a healer is not acceptable. How wrong he was.

We spoke with a Boston doctor dealing with a serious chronic illness and what we have learned is his sickness made him stronger and more sensitive. The doc woke up and started listening to his patients. Hearing them, I should say.

That is my primary complaint. When I am in an examining room, I feel as if I am talking to myself. This doctor with his own health problems will live up to the Hippocratic Oath with a fierce commitment, born of his own suffering. I imagine that is a difficult change to make. It is a mark of humility I do not associate with the medical profession.

Illness changes people, even physicians. What I generally keep to myself is my distrust, even scorn for doctors who believe they are the story when the drama of illness should be center stage. I wonder if doctors have a higher approval rating than members of Congress. But how deep is the average doc’s determination to put the public good first?

Doctors hide behind the limitations imposed by managed care. That is a cop out. They’ve only got a few minutes to learn about your life. Truncated visits with patients do not mean we are only a collection of symptoms and not the whole people we try to be, in spite of our illnesses. The purely clinical approach with little eye contact and scant dialogue about our lives render the narrative of who we really are close to meaningless.

How telling it is that a physician needs to experience serious sickness, to walk in the shoes of suffering souls, to understand what his real job is. Doctors need to look up from test results and evaluations by consulting physicians and take in the whole patient in that hospital bed. Are we out of work and scared? Maybe we are depressed or having family problems. That’s news a doc can use.

Should he or she in the white coat care about all this? Yes. Of course. The quality of connection between doctor and patient is so important. A friend in care needs to look at all the evidence to treat the whole patient. I have to admit I have given up on the doctors in my life. It is not that they are not great mechanics, but their duties should go beyond checking our spark plugs once every year.

Medical students should learn what humanism is from the get-go. Go ahead. Look it up. Medical students should start these discussions while they still remember why they went to medical school in the first place. Get them while their minds are open and they really care. By the time they are interns and residents, they are consumed with their own survival, and it may be too late.

What we don’t need are more Volvo mechanics.

It is no secret that many Americans are unhappy with their doctors but do not want to say it. How many of you are you happy with your doctors? Please open up about what is missing. Describe your chief complaint. If you don’t tell your doc how you feel, how will anything change? Add your comments to this Discussion in the Chronic Disease & Disability Exchange.

Posted by: Richard M. Cohen at 4:13 pm