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How I Deal With Well-Meaning Eczema Recommendations

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Helen Piña - Blogs
By Helen PiñaOctober 07, 2021

I’ve dealt with mild to severe eczema for decades, and I’ve tried an array of products, diets, and remedies to help make it better. I’m sure most eczema fighters have made many attempts to improve their condition. So, when someone tries to solve my eczema problem with things I’ve either obviously already tried or that just aren’t good enough, it can be frustrating.

Classic Recommendations for Improving Eczema

Essential oils, aloe vera, coconut oil, foods to avoid, foods to eat … the list goes on. It’s all a bit silly because every person’s allergens and skin sensitivities are different.

“Try this; it’s hypoallergenic.” -- Great, but I could still be allergic to the ingredients in the product.

“It’s all natural.” -- Awesome. I’m allergic to a gazillion “all natural” plants. 

“Moisturize!” -- I’d really rather not; moisturizing usually makes my skin worse.

I take eczema recommendations with a grain of salt. Someone else’s product success or eczema remedy is not a one-size-fits-all situation. Plus, sometimes people make recommendations when they themselves aren’t dealing with eczema at my level, or even at all!

Their Intentions Are Good

It helps to remember that most people are just trying to help. They see a problem and want to solve it; it’s human nature. So, they have good intentions. That doesn’t mean you need to tell them your eczema life story or what will or won’t work for you specifically. Or you can -- if you have the time and want to educate them on the complex world of skin allergies and different types of eczema. At this point, I usually just nod and say thanks if the recommendation is not viable.

Considering Suggestions Carefully

But what if someone’s suggestion actually helps?! Even though I’ve tried many remedies and products, I’m confident I haven’t tried them all. I know what I’ve tried, and I know my own body. As long as I keep those things in mind, I do consider other people’s recommendations.

I’m currently using a new homeopathic remedy that is surprisingly helping me. I say “surprisingly,” because I initially dismissed the recommendation. I decided to give it a try and it’s helped!  Not all recommendations have helped, but I still keep an open mind when I receive them. You do need to be careful, though. Talk to your doctor if you want their feedback on the recommendation, and keep in mind your own body’s sensitivities. The worst-case scenario isn’t that the recommendation doesn’t work, but that it makes your eczema worse. However, the best case is that it does help. I’m fine dealing with coconut oil and all-natural product recommendations if it means I’ll stumble across a good recommendation every now and then!

Looking for more eczema info? Join our  Eczema Resources Group on Facebook .

 

 

Photo Credit: fizkes / iStock via Getty Images Plus

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About the Author
Helen Piña

Helen Piña has lived with chronic atopic dermatitis (eczema) and skin allergies for most of her life. She’s committed to offering support, advice, and compassion to fellow eczema fighters through her Itchy Pineapple blog. Piña is married with two young children and is a marketing leader in the B2B tech industry. She lives in Houston, TX.

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