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Looking for the G-Spot? 6 Things to Know

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Laurie J. Watson, LMFT - Blogs
By Laurie J. Watson, LMFTCertified sex therapistAugust 2, 2016
From the WebMD Archives

Is the G-spot real? The evidence is a bit mysterious because the “spot” doesn’t appear to be a distinct structure, but, rather, a cluster of nerves and tissue that engorges or changes in sensation when aroused. And not all women feel it. Some women feel extreme pleasure when the spot is stimulated, but others…not a thing.

Here are 6 things to know about this sexy erogenous zone:

Where is it? The G-spot is on the roof of the vagina at about 12 o’clock when the woman is lying on her back. It is about 2.5-3 inches in the vagina directly below her urethra. The angle for self-exploration is essentially backwards for the woman so the location makes it nearly impossible to discover the spot with her own fingers.

Does every woman have it? Essentially, yes. But the degree of sexual sensation in the spot varies widely from woman to woman and can vary even within the same woman depending on the timing of arousal, time of day, time of month and season of life.

Best technique to touch it. Fingers provide the best access to the g-spot. If you are firmly but gently using a “come-hither” curl to your stroke you might feel a slight increase in firmness about the size of a quarter.

How do I know I’m touching the right spot? Some lovers report that they can’t feel any tissue differential with their fingers. Your female partner may report a delightful sensation guiding you to the correct area. Or she may say that she feels the need to urinate – this means you are at the right spot but at the wrong time. She will need considerably more general arousal before her body will translate this same touch as sexually pleasurable.

Can intercourse provide G-spot stimulation? Yes, and certain positions bring the penis into contact with the G-spot more than others. Two ways to try: 1) woman lying on her back with her legs curled up tilts her pelvis or over his elbows tilts her pelvis upwards, or 2) woman on top at a 45 degree angle. Both positions are also more likely to cause a vaginal-contact orgasm.

What if I (the woman) don’t feel anything? Ask for stimulation, immediately prior to orgasm. You might also try a G-spot stimulator sex toy to see if you can find it on your own in a no-pressure environment.

You can find Laurie Watson at AwakeningsCenter.org.

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About the Author
Laurie J. Watson, LMFT

Laurie J. Watson, LMFT, is a certified sex therapist and author of Wanting Sex Again – How to Rekindle Desire and Heal a Sexless Marriage. Laurie helps couples “keep it hot” with her weekly podcast FOREPLAY – Radio Sex Therapy, weekend intensives, and telehealth consultations. A compelling and enthusiastic presenter, Laurie is regularly invited to speak at medical schools, conferences and retreats.

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