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    Behind the Ice Bucket Challenge: How My Own Fight Against ALS Helped Fuel a Phenomenon

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    By Pat Quinn

    When you’re diagnosed with a disease that has a life expectancy of 2-5 years, you will do anything to change that. Almost 5 years ago, I was stunned as I heard my doctor say, “It’s conclusive, we can confidently diagnose you with ALS.” It was the most surreal moment of my life. Sure, I had had some crazy twitching in my arms. Yes, my hands had become weak. But, 2-5 years to live? No, that was unacceptable to me. I was only 30 years old! So, after the initial shock wore off, I decided that I was going to fight.

    The disease that was supposed to take my strength started turning me into a pit bull. I became obsessed with bringing attention to ALS – local events, community outreach, speaking, networking – I did everything I could think of to make people aware. I can’t lie – I had selfish motives. I wanted to live. I was entering what should have been the prime of my life – I should have been focusing on the joys of finding love and starting a family, not fighting a terminal disease! My fight to add years to my life grew into a passion to fight not just for myself, but for everyone with ALS. That passion got stronger every time I met a new ALS patient. One of those patients was Pete Frates in Boston, whose website I happened to come across in my online searches. Pete was young, a stellar athlete, and diagnosed with ALS a year before me. I emailed, he answered, and soon we formed a special bond that would eventually play a major role in the biggest movement in the history of philanthropy: the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge.

    You may not know it, but the Ice Bucket Challenge wasn’t originally created specifically for ALS. It was going around for a number of different causes until one golfer in Florida took the challenge for his cousin’s husband who had ALS. It caught on in that patient’s town, and the power of social media brought it to my attention. (Thank you Facebook!) I will never forget the day I saw a friend from grade school take the challenge and said he was doing it in my honor. I was blown away, but more importantly, it clicked: If this can connect so easily from one individual to another, we might have something here. Excited about the possibilities, I got my closest friends to dump buckets of ice water over their heads and it spread throughout my network – the one I had so worked so hard to build after diagnosis. Pete took the challenge, too, and shared it to his huge network. No one could have imagined what would unfold next. Soon we were right in the middle of a social media phenomenon! Hundreds of likes on every Facebook post. New videos were being uploaded every couple seconds – literally, seconds! It’s one thing to see your family and friends take the challenge. But somehow, every day it got bigger and bigger! The support for ALS I was hoping to create was taking place right before my eyes. As it happened, my head was spinning. It was surreal. Within a week, while you were probably filming your Ice Bucket Challenge in the backyard, so were the biggest athletes, famous celebrities, and even world leaders.

    Pat Quinn

    Taking the Ice Bucket Challenge in 2015

    A worldwide movement like the Ice Bucket Challenge doesn’t just happen. It’s not like any of us were sitting in a dark room drawing up blueprints to orchestrate a massive social media movement. I believe that certain things in your life happen for a reason. Not everything, of course (I’m not crazy), but I truly believe parts of your time here on earth happen for a reason. Life presents us with opportunities, and then it’s up to us to make something happen.

    Do I believe I was diagnosed with ALS for a reason? YES. Without getting too spiritual, I know God chose me to take on ALS. I have to believe this. It keeps me going. I was young. I was strong. The people I’ve met throughout my life would do anything for me. That kind of network would have the ability to create necessary awareness.

    Do I think the Ice Bucket Challenge started in a town 10 to 15 minutes away from where I lived for a reason? YES.

    Do I think I reached out to Pete Frates after diagnosis, became friends, eventually leading us to catapult the Ice Bucket Challenge for a reason? YES. There is no doubt in my mind that we met each other to change the course of ALS. It was our job to recognize its potential and make something happen…that’s exactly what we did!

    These days, there’s no awkward pause after I tell someone I have ALS. I no longer have to follow up with “you know, Lou Gehrig’s disease,” because people are aware – and that was the reason for it all. The Ice Bucket Challenge allowed me to accomplish what I set out to do: create unparalleled awareness leading to research that will one day make ALS treatable and, God-willing, cured.

    I would do anything to go back to being my normal, pre-ALS self. Anything. But I can’t dwell on that. I am facing an undefeated opponent, and I’m going to do everything I can to beat it. I know that ALS may one day take my physical life, but my fight will last forever.

    Pat Quinn

    Pat Quinn was diagnosed with ALS (Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis) in 2013, a month after his 30th birthday. Since then, Pat has become a strong advocate, explaining to others that having no effective treatments or a cure is not acceptable Pat was at the forefront of the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge, which raised over $ 220,000,000 globally. He has spoken before Congress, at companies like Google and Facebook, and at universities across the country. Pat has received many accolades for his advocacy including a nomination for TIME Magazine Person of the Year. To learn more, please visit www.q4tw.com.

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