WebMD BlogsWebMD Doctors

3 Simple Ways to Get Your Resolution Back on Track

jogging
Brunilda Nazario, MD - Blogs
By Brunilda Nazario, MDBoard-certified internist and endocrinologistFebruary 13, 2019

If you’ve already dropped your New Year’s resolution, you’re in good company – an estimated 80% of people ditch their resolution by February. But even if you’ve fallen off track, you can still get back to it. There’s no shortage of advice from health professionals about how to re-start your effort (this post by our mental health blogger and this one from our nutritionists offer some great tips) – for me, it comes down to three main things:

1. Find like-minded people. This is my ‘numero uno’ rule. We become like the people we hang out with, so surround yourself with folks who have got this ‘healthy lifestyle’ thing figured out. Not only will their healthy choices and priorities inspire you, they can probably give you some good pointers on how to make eating well and exercising more enjoyable.

2. Expect to stumble. You are going to get sidetracked from your goal sometimes. Forgive yourself and move on. After all, failure is part of success.

Here’s my advice: Take a period of time to see what works well for you – find things that motivate and help keep you on track. For example, find a fitness influencer that inspires or motivates you on social media, and click the follow button. Or, reward yourself with a healthy recipes cookbook.

During this time make mental notes of what worked well and what didn’t and use this to readjust your plan. Think about ways you could have faced a challenging situation so you’re prepared next time around.

3. Be patient. Routine creates habits, and this takes time. Research has suggested that habits take about 3 weeks to create, but everyone is different. For some, it may take more time. In the meantime, remind yourself often of your motivations for setting your goals and be patient with yourself.

Just because your resolution got off to a bumpy start doesn’t mean you should ditch it completely. There’s a reason you made that goal – you want to be a healthier version of yourself – and that goal is still worth working toward. Keep going!

WebMD Blog
© 2019 WebMD, LLC. All rights reserved.
Blog Topics:
About the Author
Brunilda Nazario, MD

Brunilda Nazario, MD, is the Lead Medical Director at WebMD and is responsible for reviewing WebMD content and ensuring its accuracy, timeliness, and credibility. She is a board certified Internist and Endocrinologist, she is also certified in Advanced Diabetes Management. Upon completion of a certification in bariatric medicine, Dr Nazario is now a Diplomate for the American Board of Obesity Medicine.

More from the WebMD Doctors Blog

  • woman with black belt

    How Martial Arts Can Boost Your Health

    If you’re looking for a way to get fit, reduce stress, improve your focus, and lower your risk of certain diseases, you may want to ...

  • tissues

    5 Ways a Doctor Avoids Getting Sick

    As a doctor, I’m always exposed to plenty of germs. And with two kids -- who also bring home lots of colds and infections -- it’s ...

View all posts on WebMD Doctors

Latest Blog Posts on WebMD

View all blog posts

Important: The opinions expressed in WebMD Blogs are solely those of the User, who may or may not have medical or scientific training. These opinions do not represent the opinions of WebMD. Blogs are not reviewed by a WebMD physician or any member of the WebMD editorial staff for accuracy, balance, objectivity, or any other reason except for compliance with our Terms and Conditions. Some of these opinions may contain information about treatments or uses of drug products that have not been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. WebMD does not endorse any specific product, service or treatment.

Do not consider WebMD Blogs as medical advice. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your doctor or other qualified healthcare provider because of something you have read on WebMD. You should always speak with your doctor before you start, stop, or change any prescribed part of your care plan or treatment. WebMD understands that reading individual, real-life experiences can be a helpful resource, but it is never a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment from a qualified health care provider. If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your doctor or dial 911 immediately.

Read More